Election 2020 Resource Hub

Published Oct 16, 2020 Updated Nov 8, 2020

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The country faces multiple crises. We’re working to ensure the Biden Administration addresses them armed with facts, evidence, and a true sense of justice.

What's at stake

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The 2020 election was unlike any in modern history. Against the backdrop of a pandemic, we saw false claims of voter fraud, deceitful robocalls, unsafe or inaccessible polling places, and many other attacks on democracy.

The election is over, but the crises are all still here. From the government’s disastrous response to COVID-19, to the mounting injustices of systemic racism, to the destruction of recent wildfires and other climate impacts—recent history has clearly shown how political interference in science can have life-threatening consequences.

[UCS will continue monitoring the electoral process to ensure the results are respected.]

Unfortunately, the nation remains as divided as ever before, and congressional gridlock appears likely.

That’s why, as the Biden administration takes office, we’re focused on rebuilding scientific expertise and capacity in the federal government, while expanding strategies that will advance our work without the need for congressional legislation.

We are:

  • Pushing for rapid implementation of our detailed 2020 roadmap to restore a robust role for science in government decisionmaking. With your help, we’ll closely track progress across all federal agencies, pressuring the new administration to rebuild scientific capacity—something the executive branch can do without legislation.
  • Mounting an all-out campaign for rapid and equitable climate action. That includes: recommitting the United States to the Paris Climate Agreement; pressing hard for a robust, job-creating federal program to build a modern electricity grid; and working with local partners to prepare for the effects of climate change in ways that recognize the disproportionate threat posed to Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) and low-income communities across the country.
  • Unveiling a bold suite of clean transportation initiatives to speed the electrification of the transportation sector—an urgent effort that will reduce air pollution, tackle climate change, and improve community health.

With your support, we’ll use science to transform the country into something better. The world depends on it.

In addition to the new initiatives laid out above, UCS scientists and advocates are also:

  • Building a new cross-disciplinary team of scientists, analysts, and economists to fight for an equitable and science-based COVID-19 economic recovery package. Our leadership on clean energy, transportation, and sustainable food systems gives us unique credibility with Congress in pressing for these kinds of policies.
  • Expanding our voting rights work. We’ll develop a series of science-based steps to reduce barriers to participation, and combat voter suppression and gerrymandering. We’ll also promote the National Popular Vote Campaign to eliminate our outmoded reliance on the electoral college.
  • Launching a multidisciplinary initiative to build deeper engagement with communities on the frontlines of environmental pollution. We’re already working with local partners in Delaware, Texas, and Louisiana to design analytic and outreach tools to help their communities respond to health crises (such as those posed by exposure to toxic air and water, and worsened by unequal access to health care).
  • Pushing harder than ever for groundbreaking state and regional energy solutions. We’ll fight for 100 percent clean energy in Illinois, Minnesota, and Massachusetts, and continue demonstrating the feasibility and benefits of renewables, including how to intentionally bring their benefits to low-income communities and communities of color.
  • At UCS, we know training scientists for civic engagement and advocacy offers a powerful avenue to build power and social change. That’s why we’re expanding our leadership development program for scientists who are organizing in their own communities and institutions. By equipping these emerging leaders with the tools they need to respond to opportunities at the local and state level, we are building resilience against attacks on science around the country.
  • Strengthening our groundbreaking campaign to hold fossil fuel companies accountable for their role in the climate crisis. We’re building a robust international network of experts working at the nexus of science and climate litigation. This work will spur new research and offer expert assistance to the burgeoning number of lawsuits filed against these companies for fraud.

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